Why You Need Extended Enterprise Learning Integration

A Tale of Two Salespeople Zack is customer service and sales rep at a technology hardware store. He is trying to learn the business, but he just can’t seem to find enough time to study the product manuals. His manager tries to spend time teaching him sales techniques, but they always appear to be some crisis pulling her away. He attempts to make the most of his “ups,” but he usually must bring one of the more experienced people into the conversation. His co-workers try to help him with tips and tricks, but it doesn’t come together into understanding. When Zack asks about training programs, his manager says they can’t afford it. He is thinking about moving on. Zelda works at a similar store across town. One of their suppliers is introducing a new line of products today, and she is pumped. For the past two weeks, she has been viewing product videos on her mobile phone. Each video explains features and benefits, and how to position them with a customer. At the end of each video is a quiz so she can check her knowledge. Both the supplier and the local distributor offer micro-lessons on sales techniques she can access on her mobile. As she completes each lesson, her manager gets a notification so he can follow up on how it relates to her product lines and customers. Zelda will receive a bonus for every product she sells. The learning management system tells the sales application that she has qualified for the bonus through training, so a sale will automatically trigger a bonus to payroll. Zelda loves her job. Learning in the Extended Enterprise Almost every business in the world is part of an extended enterprise – a system of organizations that work together to do what they could not accomplish alone. It can include suppliers, customers, distributors, sales teams, service technicians, value-add resellers, and franchises – any kind of organization you can imagine. Government regulators and industry associations are part of the ecosystem. Also, contingent workers, contractors, and freelancers. Each member of the extended enterprise relies on others to create efficiencies, manage compliance, and control costs, but it’s not all about downside risk. There’s an upside – collaborative relationships can foster synergy that drives performance and innovation. Read more: https://blog.pixentia.com/why-you-need-extended-enterprise-learning-integration

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