Renaissance

For decades, learning has depended on a conventional model premised on the scarcity of available knowledge and an emphasis on establishing mechanisms to transmit that knowledge from the center (capital city, headquarters) to the periphery (field, village, training room).

With the Internet, scarcity disappeared. But the economy of high-cost, low-volume training has persisted, with little or no accountability.

That economy need to be rebuilt in a digital-first age. It requires a new, long-term infrastructure.

The platforms that could do this are the ones that deeply care about the people they reach, with teams who understand that trust in boundless digital spaces must be earned. It has to come from the heart.

The quality of content also matters, but it is not sufficient.

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